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Your Health and Art

Art in Support of National ‘Wear Red’ Day

National Wear Red Day is meant to draw attention and awareness to the dangers of heart disease in women.  It is celebrated the first Friday in February and there are many ways you can get involved to show support.  That support doesn’t have to end one that first Friday is gone though. Picking a bold piece of art can be a way to draw attention to the cause all year long.

Woman in Red- Odilon Redon

In this piece of beautiful symbolist art, Redon depicts a woman under the vibrant veil of red. The artist’s style obscures the subject’s face, which gives it a mysterious quality. This allows the woman to represent all women at once in the artist’s vision. The mixture of colors and textures is meant to invoke strong emotions and the bright red ads to the vibrancy. It creates a dreamlike image that will draw the audience in and spark a lot of conversation.

Sunflowers (Red) – Van Gogh Interpretation – La Pastiche Originals

The dynamic color palette of “Sunflowers (Red)” by Vincent Van Gogh is truly something special to behold. It is clearly a work of Van Gogh thanks to the quick, sharp brushstrokes and bold shapes. However, the still life subject makes it unique among many of his other works, which depicted night scenes or portraits of individuals. Those looking for a floral painting, however, will love that this still life looks anything but still thanks to Van Gogh’s incredible Post-Impressionist techniques. Striking contrasts in “Sunflowers (Red)” make the painting truly come alive, and the matte colors are layered in a way to create just a hint of dimension.

Red White and Blue – Allan P Friedlander

Allan P. Friedlander likes to draw his inspiration from the wild landscapes he lives around. He hopes to capture the passion and beauty of nature. The way he places the red in the center of the layout is very bold, but without overpowering. Friedlander uses color to express energy to his audience and you can share that energy with all of your guests.

Cottage Window- Charles Demuth

Charles Demuth was a famous American artist from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, who primarily worked with watercolors, and later, oils. He is most known for his work in Precisionism, a movement that combined elements of Cubism and Futurism. This included the use of distinct colors and shapes. The bold colors and smooth, clean lines set Demuth’s work apart. In Cottage Window Demuth makes use especially of the bold colors. On a flat black background, the vivid red of the flowers and the gold and whites of the curtains stand out.

Flamenco Reproduction- Justyna Kopania

This “Flamenco” painting by Justyna Kopania takes a familiar scene and strips it down to the essentials. With the simplicity of just a few shapes, Kopania is able to convey an incredible amount of emotion and movement. This Polish artist also adds subtle shading to give texture and volume to the painting, especially in the skirt of the dancer. Though the scene is a realistic one, there’s an element of surrealism present that makes it endlessly fascinating to look at.

Lady in an Armchair- Gustav Klimt

Originally painted in 1897, Klimt (1862-1918) showcases a lady dressed in bold red gazing into the background, swallowed up by an equally red curtain while the armchair she rests in struggles to peek out. The richly textured composition draws its influence from American painter James Abbot McNeill Whistler. With its vibrant color and intrigue, this painting is sure to be enjoyed by art collectors and enthusiasts alike.

Any of these pieces will add a vibrant touch to your home while showing your support for the Wear Red movement. We here at overstockArt want to help you and help others raise awareness for such an important day.

Amanda Hadley

About the Author

Amanda graduated from the University of Kansas, where she studied English literature and got a masters degree in library sciences. She enjoys reading, cooking and playing with her nephews. Her best friend is her little dog Brady.